When someone says, “people are where they want to be in life” or “everyone has a chance to be what they want to be,” I’m often too flabbergasted to respond productively. I’m all about constructive communication these days, but how do you say, “Are you fucking kidding me” nicely?

Well, earlier this year, I took a seminar with Dr. David Campt, a man colloquially known as the “White People Whisperer,” and I learned that asking questions is a good way to open a dialogue with racism-skeptics.

So, here’s my question: If people are where they want to be in life…


For the last four years, social media has been flooded with posts about not letting politics or a difference of opinion come between families or friendships. I mostly agree with this. In many cases, we shouldn’t let differences define our relationships with other people — and, yes, this includes politics. During the 2008 and 2012 presidential election, I never once thought that anyone who voted for John McCain or Mitt Romney was a bad person. I didn’t lose respect for them or allow their vote to affect our relationship. Whatever their politics, McCain and Romney proved themselves to be good…


Cropped official portrait of Vice President Joe Biden in his West Wing Office at the White House, Jan. 10, 2013. (Official White House Photo by David Lienemann)

In his speech at the Democratic National Convention, Presidential Nominee Joe Biden set the tone for both a restorative and proactive White House administration come 2021. His ascension to President of the United States isn’t certain, but Biden’s speech inspires the kind of reasonable confidence politics has lacked in recent years. However, many still doubt Biden’s commitment to change, despite his platform boasting some of the most progressive policies from any Democrat nominated to the presidency.

The progressives that oppose Biden push back against the popular notion that once Trump is evicted and the spread of Covid-19 is under control…


Photos by Sawyer Sutton and Life Matters from Pexels

I recently encountered a debate regarding the choice to fly the American flag vs. the Black Lives Matter flag. I was first struck by the rhetorical fallacy in comparing the flags as equals, since the Black Lives Matter flag doesn’t claim to be the national flag, nor does it alter the American flag in order to relay its message. In fact, Black Lives Matter wasn’t originally a flag at all. …


With the election quickly approaching, and the country as divided as ever, it’s nearly impossible not to impart some sort of political consciousness in our children — and that’s not a bad thing. It’s actually imperative that we talk to our children about controversial issues (like politics and social justice) from a very young age while their brain is undergoing extensive neurological and psychological development. A child’s prefrontal cortex, or the part of the brain that involves complex cognitive processing like decision making, social behavior, and morality, continues to mature and develop into their mid-twenties.

Photo by Julia M Cameron from Pexels

This means that a parent…


The average American might tell you they don’t like the idea of democratic socialism. Nazi’s were socialists, after all, and so is that woman from the Bronx who doesn’t know her place and frequently yells at men who are just doing their job by ignoring their constituents actual needs and instead focusing all of their energy on regulating women so they stop yelling at them in the streets. Dissenters usually say something like: “Socialism is for lazy people,” or “Socialism won’t work for America’s population size,” or “Socialism sounds scary because my grandfather yelled about it a lot.” My personal…


Imagine you’re at a carnival, and directly ahead of you is four carousels. When you ignore the screaming children and the gum stuck to the bottom of your shoe, you see that the four carousels look identical in size, color, and decoration. The only place they differ is the speed in which they turn.

Carousel at night.
Carousel at night.
Photo by Mihai Vlasceanu from Pexels

The two carousels on the left turn at a slow, leisurely pace. Anyone who were to ride on them should feel confident that they would be able to enjoy an lidless cup of coffee and expertly apply eyeliner at the same time. The carousels on the…


America’s polarization isn’t easily explained, much to the average politician’s chagrin. As tempting as it is to claim Person A and Person B have irreconcilable differences due to X, there’s a gap between theory and praxis. That isn’t to say that our differences are so complicated they can’t be understood. The truth is, the division of modern America can be intelligibly explained by the liberation-domination dialectic. In a society built on capitalistic freedom, an American’s liberty is an elusive dream or a sinister scheme that can only be found through domination over other Americans. …


A hand holding up a peace sign with an American Flag image laid over it
A hand holding up a peace sign with an American Flag image laid over it
Photo by David Peterson from Pexels

With the country in a constant state of chaos, it can be difficult to know where to put your social justice energy- especially if you’re new to social justice leadership. I transitioned into becoming a social justice leader in my community right before the pandemic hit, so I learned how to be an effective advocate while hiding food during glitchy zoom calls and watching long webinars in the bath tub. I learned despite tediously sifting through mile-long email threads and fathom deep FAQ pages, and I did it with very little one-on-one support.

Although my social justice interests are wide…


Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

I sat down at my computer today intending to edit an essay tentatively titled The (Un)Interpellated Voter, where I discuss Judith Butler’s critique of Louis Althusser’s theory of interpellation and apply it to tribalism and polarization in America. But when I sat down and looked up at the white board above my computer, I no longer had the strength of mind to take on such a task. There on my white board, written in my unimpressive script, is everything I’ve joyfully taken responsibility for. I see essays and books I need to read, videos on registering first time voters and…

Nicole Gantz

I write on philosophy, literature, current events, and humanity at large. Occasionally, I’ll throw in some fiction to mix things up.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store